Views on burka ban in non-muslim countries?

how many of you are supporting/in favour of burka ban in non muslim countries?

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Bablu Means
B
1 following.
Release As Guest
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16 ANSWER

I'll be happy if they ban Sharia law.

Shanmugam Simpson
S

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Shanmugam Simpson
S

It's sign of unequality among any Religion

Muhammad Le
M

why muslims don't question Saudi Govt. For their rights?.. Why other muslims not allowed to marry a saudi/arab woman like in usa or Eu or India??

Bablu Means
B

They have their own will don't interfere in Marriage Rules

Muhammad Le
M

Either ban Shari'a law or implement in Full for Muslims.

Why only some parts as per convenience???

Rakesh Haney
R

Sharia law has no place in modern society sir.

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

Dead as dodo

Rakesh Haney 3 years

Indeed sir. It saddens me that we should try to change the beautiful differences in others societys to appease the vanity of our own.

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

Too old medival n barbaric laws need to change or abandoned. Society n civilization will not get in reverse gear !

Rakesh Haney 3 years

I agree.

Andrew Cantrell 3 years
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Any Muslim living in any non muslim area must live by the laws that are instated... You cannot introduce your own laws... İf they dont like it they dont have to live here... İn fact, id help them leave. I think the hijab is beautiful.... But the burkha is unnacceptable..stop trying to change everyones traditions please. You certainly wouldnt allow such leniance in muslim countrys.

Andrew Cantrell
A

Cool

Rakesh Haney
R

Burka is too covering, you rob a bank throw on a burka you're free... Its one thing if youre going to religious ceremony or in private but its like wearing a ski mask walking down the street.. İf i put on a burka everyone will think I'm a Muslim woman.

Alex Coulter
A

I agree... İ dont want to strip away anyones rights... Muslim or non muslim... But covering your face is not acceptable.

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

why only burkha. Why not give women of there community all rights that we give to women in our socity. And if you are at someones home d n tel him to folow your rules then whats the logic behind it

Et AZe Barton
E

I won't be happy, every 1 has aright to dress asby his/her wish

Hood Langley
H

Even walk down the street in a bikini??

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

If it has no effect to the environment around.

Hood Langley 3 years

May at some Miami streets

Hood Langley 3 years

What if it causes men to want to rape them?? Should they cover up??

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

Any way we who want it or don't. We shall all die. But a good act shall always remain good whether u like or not and abad one will never become good because many people are in support of it

Hood Langley
H

And the more they plan to destroy Islam is the more it will get more stronger#dominating

Hood Langley
H

Its more like islam trying to convert the world

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

It makes me neither happy or sad if it disappears... İv been led to believe its growing. I hope its maturing.

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

Hope so

Andrew Cantrell 3 years

Over 1.6billion at current manshaALLAH in the next 30yrs. I believe it will be over 2.2or2.5billion Muslims inshaALLAH

Hood Langley 3 years

I do hope if thats true Hood Langley that the followers of the religion mature and concentrate on being better people instead of world domination.

Andrew Cantrell 3 years
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Milan Sai... There are other stories too here is the one:-


Last week Downing Street said the PM would support schools that wanted to impose dress codes that banned the niqab.
Picture: REUTERS
By Nesrine Malik
8:02PM BST 20 Sep 2013
Nesrine Malik resented having to wear the niqab in Saudi Arabia. But she believes the argument against it is not as simple as some think

I would rather no one wore a niqab. I would rather that no woman had effectively to disappear, from a young age, because that is the norm in her family. I would rather that no one had to go through the discomfort and social awkwardness of dealing with a woman whose face you cannot see. I would rather that Islam be purged of the niqab and all its permutations.

But for all the controversy this piece of cloth has generated this week – from schools and hospitals to courts of law, barely has a day gone by when there has not been a story of either a woman forced to take off her veil or coerced into putting it on – I am afraid that the law does not exist to pander to personal penchants.

As someone who grew up in Muslim countries, and who was forced to wear the niqab in my late teens when I moved from Sudan to Saudi Arabia, I found it an unpleasant and initially traumatic experience.

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For me, wearing a veil was at times uncomfortable, hot, stuffy, limiting and impractical. At other times it was quotidian, sometimes even reassuring. Depending on the context, it either instilled a deep sense of shame about my body, or stripped social interaction down and made it more straightforward. My peers, when they left Saudi Arabia, would sometimes still wear it for the sense of social ease it provides. Not every woman you see in a niqab is chafing in discomfort – for some, it makes life easier.

After moving to the UK in my twenties, I still wore the abaya (the black cloak that accompanies the niqab) and head scarf in appropriate social contexts, out of decorum and cultural sensitivity. It became apparent to me that, in the UK, the niqab was far more linked to assertion of identity than in other countries in which I had lived where the majority of the population was Muslim.

To give some idea of the real importance of the niqab in Islam – apart from Saudi Arabia, one of the few places where it is obligatory – the garment was, and remains, a minority phenomenon in Muslim countries. In my own country of origin, Sudan, a country under Sharia governance since 1989, the niqab is worn by very few women, and to do so is considered a choice made by those who have a very personal and very limited interpretation of Islamic dress.

It is by no means something that the majority of even conservative Muslim women agree on and I have seen, in my own family, women dissuaded from wearing the niqab.

The hijab, or head scarf, is regarded as the middle ground of modesty. Anything at either extreme of that is seen as excessively immodest or fundamentalist. Even within Islamic jurisprudence, there is a recognition that the niqab is actually a pre‑Islamic phenomenon, which was then mixed with the prevailing cultures in the Middle East.

For such a minority issue to dominate such a large space in the UK’s political discourse is ludicrous. It is also unproductive. The debate often ends up a proxy for all sorts of different agendas – politicians furthering careers, misplaced feminist solidarity, Muslims asserting an identity they feel is under assault, and some good old-fashioned prejudice. The argument over whether or not to ban the niqab is one of those questions that brings out the worst in everyone. The problem is that, in a way, both sides are wrong.

Those who defend the right of women to wear the niqab under the banner of religious freedom gloss over the fact that this “freedom” is often dictated by social pressure. Those who oppose it under the banner of secularism and the oppressive nature of the niqab are making their own assumptions about Muslim women’s motivations.

The debate about the veil is not about religious freedom. It is about civil liberty proscribed by practicality – a liberty that entails that no woman should be told what to wear, except where this choice actually infringes on someone else’s rights.

When it comes to matters of security, identification, and other legal matters it is highly reasonable that a woman be asked to show her face. All further legislation on the matter should be rooted in freedom of choice.

David Cameron’s insistence that some institutions be allowed to dictate dress code appears to have led to the silent banning of the niqab for professionals dealing with patients in hospitals, on the one hand, and Muslim schools enforcing religious dress on the other. In both cases, women have been deprived of their right to choose.

I believe the Government should be more robust in determining the guidelines. No manner of dress should be compulsory. Girls in schools should not be forced to wear religious dress when they are too young to question it. In hospitals, the concern that patients should be able to see health‑care professionals’ faces is a valid one. A lot of the arguments against the niqab are valid, but I am not sure that they call for a ban.

In France, a ban on veils in public places has done nothing but provide a state sanction for prejudice. The most visible target is women who cover their faces.

A crackdown on the niqab might be seen as the hallmark of a nation that stands up for its principles, but is in fact the opposite. As Dan Hodges wrote in the Telegraph this week: This is Britain, and in Britain you should be allowed to wear what you want.

The response to this, of course, is: But what about those woman who can’t wear what they want because they are being coerced into wearing the niqab? The answer is, unless you can look into every woman’s heart and know her motivations, this is a risk we will have to tolerate.

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Bablu Means
B

Milan Sai... A Deep insight by a non-muslim Indian woman....

By Radhika Sanghani
3:55PM BST 23 Sep 2013
What is it like to wear a niqab for a day? Radhika Sanghani finds out for Telegraph Wonder Women, as the UK debates the role of the face veil in society.

How do you react when you see a woman walking down the street in a niqab? Be honest.

Do you:

a) Feel intimidated and avert your eyes?

b) Stare?

c) React as you would to any other woman?

I used to aim forc, but in reality, I've always looked away.

I looked away because I felt uncomfortable. My intention was to be respectful and not stare. But the outcome? Well, I didn’t really think about it - until I decided to cover myself in a niqab last week during a national debate on the veil and take a flight from Brussels to London.

I am a British Indian so when I was dressed in the niqab, I looked like a typical Muslim woman. Sitting on the tube in London, people looked at me – and then immediately turned away. There were no shared smiles of consolation when I dropped my iPhone, or sympathetic glances when a teenager playing blaring music sat next to me. With my face covered, nobody knew if I was smiling or frowning. They all assumed I wanted to be left totally alone, without the usual public interactions you can expect on public transport. I didn’t.

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The other side of the niqab doesn't feel good
Their reactions made me feel like I didn’t exist. Perhaps it was an attempt on their parts to try and respect my veil and perceived religion, but in reality it came across as coldness. Without any input from me, the veil quickly converted itself into a ‘do not disturb’ sign hanging from my face.

It also took at least a couple of hours to get used to the physical restrictions of wearing such a heavy garment over my face. I found it difficult to breathe at first, but soon learned to readjust to having a piece of material over my mouth. I also found wearing a niqab pretty hot, as you might imagine – even with just a dress and tights on underneath.

Britain is better than Brussels
When I arrived in Brussels, the public reaction was even worse. The security man at border control took one look at me and rolled his eyes. “People like you, people with your religion, need to respect our laws. If you don’t want to show your face, don’t come to our country. Take your… [he gestured to my face] off now or get out of this airport,” he said, pointing to the exit with his finger. I hadn’t yet uttered a single word.

He refused to let me take off my veil privately or with a female officer. He forced me to remove it publicly. I stared at him defiantly as he identified me, not wanting to give him the satisfaction of showing how much his words had upset me, but I can only imagine how hard it would have been for a Muslim woman.

This insensitive treatment at the hands of the Brussels guards was starkly different to the British border control's approach. Our guards directed me to a woman who politely asked me if I preferred to remove the niqab on the spot or in private. I opted for the private option, grateful for the choice. She duly took me to a secluded corner and there I showed her my face.

The logistics
There were other less serious issues with wearing the niqab. Logistically, I had no idea what shoes to wear with it – could I wear my favourite heeled ankle boots? In the end I wore ballet flats with tights, but I was constantly checking my skirt wasn’t riding up as I walked, and I found myself struggling with my handbag as it caught on my veil.

When I drank a smoothie in Starbucks, several businessmen stared at me. They were transfixed by how I managed to use the ‘flap’ of the veil to cover my mouth as I drank. I felt self-conscious. Their stares weren’t malicious but it was uncomfortable being watched so closely – especially when some juice dribbled down my niqab.

At times my natural confidence seemed to juxtapose my covered body. People stared when I laughed and talked loudly with an unveiled friend. I felt like people were thinking, ‘why is she so loud and confident when she is covering herself head-to-toe?’ Perhaps that thought was just an extension of my subconscious prejudices of what people were thinking about me. However, train commuters did look shocked when I had an animated chat on phone on the way home about Game of Thrones.

Some unexpected perks
In other ways, it was liberating. Once I had got used to people either ignoring me or staring at me, I felt a sense of calmness. They weren’t looking at me – they were looking at the niqab. Once I finally accepted all of this, I was able to enjoy the benefits.

I yawned widely and didn’t have to automatically raise my hand to cover my mouth. I pulled it over my eyes and used it as a blindfold on the plane. I walked down my high street and no one knew who I was. If people looked at me and made judgements, it was always a judgement about the niqab. It wasn’t personal, because they couldn’t see my clothes, my body, or my facial expressions. I was hidden.

The reality
Although these small things were liberating, they are also the reasons why I believe women should not wear the niqab when giving evidence in court. Facial expressions are important and the veil definitely acts as a barrier. I don’t think girls should be veiled at school either, but I would never say we should ban the niqab. We don’t have the right to. It is an individual choice and religious freedom of expression.

Instead, we should be discussing how we can change our attitudes to the niqab and its owner. There is always a real, breathing woman beneath the veil and she doesn’t deserve to be ignored. I will never look at a veiled woman and just see a niqab again. I’ll try and see the person beneath it and if she drops her phone, I’ll hand it back with a smile.






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Bablu Means
B

should not be ban, because it is not proper to touch any religion act if it doesnt troubles the society. What does this burka troubles the society i wonder

Dev Villalobos
D

who told you that muslim people force their ladies to wear burqa? İ m not muslim but i know many of them and some wears and some do not.

Dev Villalobos 3 years

how can u say that? Did u interview them ?

Dev Villalobos 3 years

Milan Sai what happening anywhere, go ask them full story then decide, unlike media

Dev Villalobos 3 years

we hindu give our lives for any friend we have, in our society we have christians muslims hindu and sikh in India, we are all one body, anyone comes to break us or offenses us we hindu break them

Dev Villalobos 3 years

you do not treat yourself among us but we do, maybe thats the difference between u and me ,

Dev Villalobos 3 years
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